Wednesday, 11 January 2012

Peppa the naughty pig

Now many, many a time (especially at the moment) I have dreamt of giving that naughty little minx Peppa Pig a big cuddle.



A big warm cuddle between two slices of bread with a side hug of ketchup.

I am not a big fan of the pig they call Peppa, George or any of her family and friends. In fact they make my teeth itch. But this is purely because I have Peppa Pig overload.

In my house there is a Peppa Pig lunchbox, She takes up most of my Sky Plus planner with her sneaky little 5 minute episodes, there are welly boots, a coat, books, pencils, you name it, it probably has Peppa Pig stitched, stamped or painted on it. If it hasn't, then my child has probably stuck a Peppa sticker on it (remind me to get that off the cat soon)

BUT.................................................................

At no point in my pyschopathic hatred of Peppa have I ever thought that she was a bad influence on my children because she is naughty!!

A pain in my arse? Maybe. But naughty?

You know this is a cartoon right?

If we are going to pick a TV programme as a bad influence I am damn sure that between us we can come up with something a lot worse than Peppa Pig.

I was brought up on Tom & Jerry, and it never did me any harm (Hits Mr F round the head with a frying pan)

That damn cat and mouse were evil to each other, but you don't see me stealing car radios or chilling out in a crack den at the weekends.

Course you don't.


So, I hear you ask, what has this Peppa Pig done to cause such uproar? Why are people thinking of teaching her a lesson by hanging her up in a dry cupboard seasoned in salt!!!

Well apparently there are children out there that have taken to jumping up and down in muddy puddles!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Small ones have been telling their parents NO

And, AND they have been saying YUK to vegetables.

GASP

Who would have thought that of small children?

It MUST be Peppa Pigs fault. Let us teach her a lesson by slicing her thinly and cooking her. (On the grill of course, I am dieting)

Parents, a newsflash for you. Children say no, and they don't like vegetables, That is why we the parents are the ones who have to do the PARENTING, We don't leave it up to a cartoon pig to teach our children what is right and wrong.

Your child says no, we say yes, Your child refuses to eat their vegetables and demands chocolate cake instead, then WE say no (and find cunning ways to hide their vegetables in their food)

Your child chooses to jump up and down in muddy puddles.

YOU JOIN THEM, hold their hands, laugh and stamp with them.

What kind of parent thinks that jumping up and down in muddy puddles is a bad thing anyway?

A parent that moans about a child jumping up and down in a muddy puddle?

THAT is the bad influence in a childs life.

Not Peppa Pig (although, can we eat her anyway-please?)

What do you think?

Is Peppa a bad influence on your children, or do people need to lighten up a bit?


Let me know


Big Fashionista x x
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10 comments

  1. My wife and I were mortified by this story! When people are trying to blame TV for the fact that their children are behaving like, well, CHILDREN, it really makes me wonder why these people ever bothered breeding. As a society we worry about kids growing up too fast, but complain when they don't act grown up enough - the kids can't win.

    And more to the point, if your kid is outside jumping in a muddy puddle, at least they're outside getting some exercise and not glued to the telly!

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  2. Fantastic! Absolutely agree with you - especially about that peppa pig sarnie as I too am back on SureSlim! Parents need to learn to say no to their small children.

    One of my favourite sayings when mine were small and complaining about why they had to do something they didn't want to do was "because I'm the mummy, and it's my job to do what I think is best for you".

    Now they're 15 and 16 and it's worked pretty well so far.

    Now I find myself saying "Why can't I have a cuddle - I'm your Mummy!" - but then we can't have everything. They are teenage boys after all.

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  3. i dont have children but i do find that some parents seem to like to find any excuse for a child's bad behaviour instead of taking responsibility for it themselves. If a child is misbehaving surely as the adult it is your responsibility to teach them that this is wrong, they are children after all and only learn by getitng things wrong.

    Maybe if they are that worried they should drag their child away from the Tv and actually have face time with them instead of being lazy enough to allow a Tv show to parent their child....

    but what do I know i'm a childless moaner who just likes to have her say :D

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  4. Totally agree! It seems like TV is always the first scapegoat when parents want something to blame. I don't see why parents don't accept a lot of these so called negative behaviours for what they are... Kids being kids!

    I was brought up on Looney Tunes... and funnily enough I don't hunt rabbits or drop anvils on unsuspecting roadrunners!

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  5. Haha, I knew this blog post was going to be brilliant!

    Having three kids aged six & under, I too am a Peppa victim. A lot of my income seems to get spent on Peppa/Ben & Holly merchandise and my home is littered with piggy paraphernalia.

    But I actually like the cartoons - I'm not yet at the point where the sound of an 'oink' drives me insane, and the occasional subtle 'in-joke' aimed at the adults is one of the thing about it that makes me chuckle. The Daily Fail article made me literally LOL, though.

    I'm not professing to be dad of the decade, but seriously - "One father spoke of his despair at how his four-year-old son had taken to splashing in what he gleefully called ‘muddy puddles’ on his way to school – copying Peppa’s favourite pastime." Are you kidding me?!

    On the way to nursery is a puddle that my boy (aged 3) approaches on a daily basis to jump in. If he hasn't got his (George Pig) wellies on, he's forbidden from doing it. The first time I told him no, he asked why, and I told him it was because he didn't have his wellies on. He accepted it. Now, if he isn't wearing wellies, he still heads for the puddle but stops short of it, telling me, "No jumping in muddy puddles today, daddy. Not got my wellies on!"

    His twin sister (also 3, oddly) is a fussy eater. That's putting it lightly. Anything new (or green) is a struggle. But the simple fact is, if she doesn't eat enough of what's put in front of her and at least try the new stuff, there's no pudding. She accepts this as being ‘the rule’ and now doesn’t even ask for dessert if she hasn’t done what she knows is expected of her.

    Am I just lucky? Do I have some of the world's best-behaved children? Or are some of today's parents just looking for something - anything to blame because they don't know how to guide their children in what's good behaviour and what's naughty?

    And where does this ‘blame anything’ mentality end? If Peppa’s affection for muddy puddles is a bad influence on our children, how about these:
    - Ben 10: Transforms into an alien and blows stuff up.
    - Norman Price (the ginger kid in Fireman Sam): CONSTANTLY causing fires and being generally mischievous/careless.
    - That bloke with the cheeks you want to pinch in Balamory: Has irresponsibly painted his entire house pink.
    - Bob the Builder: Not only fails to wear a seatbelt when riding on his vehicular friends - he rides them standing up half of the time!

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  6. Hmm, I do think kids learn from TV - I'll never forget hearing about my friends kids crashing planes after the twin towers went down. Kids are programmed to learn by copying - that's how they learn to talk. If you wouldn't want a rude role model in your house don't let one in on the TV.

    On the other hand I agree with you whole heartedly that parents need to remember whos in charge and loosen up to a bit of puddle jumping....unless it's in your brand new school shoes on the way to school...time and place. If they won't eat there greens or at least try a mouthful swallowed down not spat straight out then they don't get anything else, simple as that. They will not starve, just eat double at the next meal. As parents we have become a bunch of wimps and forgotten that the TV has an off button.

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  7. Oh and the bit I forgot is, try talking to your kids about what they are watching. Explain what happens on TV and real life aren't always the same other wise you'll be blaming Eastenders for who knows what in a few years time.

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  8. I hate Peppa Pig, my daughter isn't one to copy from TV but my god, that pig is a precocious little shit.

    Glad Emmy doesn't really watch it anymore! Plus they keep changing the voice and the most recent one I saw she sounded like a 50 a day smoker, and I hate smoked bacon

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  9. Parents should have the greatest influence in their house. TV does have it's powers but who's in charge of the TV?
    We all have our opinions as to what is a good and bad infulence for our children but as the parent I believe for the most part I am in charge of what I allow my child to be exposed to and take responsibility for it. Will Poor little Peppa end up taking the flack for weak-willed parents and bold children? I can think of worse, much worse!

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  10. Oh for Gods sake! Someone has got too much time on their hands! This is just entertainment for kids, as u said, Tom and Jerry-like. I didn't copy Dastardly and Muttley chasing pigeons all over the place, or think it ok to shove my hand up a mouses arse a la Fingerbobs! It's not real people.

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