Wednesday, 13 May 2015

Sharing is not caring



Are you one of those people with a social responsibility? One that you take very, very seriously? Are you considerate, caring, helpful and consider yourself to be one of the people who makes a difference in the world?

Do you do this by pressing like and share on Facebook posts warning of paedophiles in your area, or pictures of missing blonde girls who have been kidnapped, or even pictures of a man who beat up his girlfriend and you are sharing the pictures to warn others?


JUST STOP.

Over the last few weeks, this practice has been pushed to the front of peoples minds once again, after a woman took a picture in Melbourne, Australia and put it up on Facebook after she thought he was taking a picture of her children.

THE PICTURE WAS SHARED OVER 20,000 TIMES. 

It turns out that the man was taking a selfie, for his own children. He was not a "creep" as she described him, he was just another human being that, in a split second was branded as a paedophile incorrectly and then found himself having this incorrect assumption spread around the world by the power of social media.

When you share a picture, and you do not know the full story, you are in danger of doing the same thing. You may feel that you are "helping" "making a difference" you aren't. What would have happened if this man would have experienced vigilantes, who had read about him being a "creep" and decided to see justice was done so that he didn't take pictures of children anymore?

What if that man DIDN'T beat up his ex girlfriend?
What happens if mistaken identity means it wasn't THAT woman who kicked a puppy?

What if people are WRONG, like the woman in Melbourne was? She has apologised, but does that make it any better? Some people will say, "Oh but you cannot be too careful these days, surely it is better to warn others, just in case" Er, unless you have the FULL FACTS, DO NOT HIT THAT SHARE BUTTON. I see pictures shared that are 5 years out of date, full of incorrect details, and basic bullshit and people just press share without thinking of the implications.

Social media is superb for spreading a message, getting things done and spreading awareness, but it is also where lies can spread like wildfire and people sometimes do not realise that they are fanning the flames.

For you it is just a "share" but be aware that this can be someones LIFE that you break.

And saying sorry afterwards if you are wrong, doesn't always make it better.





What do you think, do people believe what they read too easily on social media? Would you have shared the picture of the Melbourne man? Let me know your thoughts.



Big Fashionista x x x



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5 comments

  1. I'm glad to say I don't hit the share button, or the like one, that often. I've become terribly cynical and don't trust a lot of what i see online. It amazes me when I see people overreacting or sharing info that is either fake, or click-bait. I would have not shared the picture of the Melbourne man had I seen it, it's not my role to spread awareness of a "possible danger", and I think social media turns a lot of people into wannabe prophets/justice fighters. And don't get me started on picture quotes, Marilyn said this, Steve Jobs said that. Read autobiographies, pick up a book, verify where that piece of crap comes from before bombarding the world with it.

    ReplyDelete
  2. GAH Seriously my major gripe with the likes of Facebook! I have a few people on my friends list who do these things and I've pointed this out but of course, they don't care/ can't see the harm they are doing to that persons life.
    JUST STOP, GUYS!!!!
    Gillian xx EyelinerFlicks

    ReplyDelete
  3. I cannot abide these sorts of posts, and that is why so many of my FB friends have been muted. I have several times in the past had to remind people that sharing certain posts is illegal (the 'This is what Jamie Bulgers killers look like now' posts etc).
    I try very hard to check facts before I make up any opinion on what I see online as so much of it is fake or taken so far out of context as to make it false (Such as the recent retweeting of Nicola Sturgeons tweet expressing sorrow at Jimmy savilles death, only four years out of date).

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  4. These type of posts annoys me so much....My friends daughter had a heart transplant a good few years ago and has since died....There is a picture of her and her daughter from when she was in the hospital raising awareness about organ donation doing the rounds saying if this photo gets a 1000 shares the child will live and get her heart transplant! It is heartbreaking for the family. They would have given anything for her to be still here and seeing her pic being used is tears them apart....
    I don't share photos/things like that unless I have all the facts!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Couldn't agree more with this. I have seen a few really worrying things on my personal Facebook page lately - particularly cropping up on group/selling pages. One time someone accused one of their neighbors of 'looking at their kids'. I couldn't help but think what if this was an old man, just looking out of his window? Another girl also recently accused a man of stalking her and posed pictures of the man and his car (including vehicle reg). I get that people sometimes worry or feel intimidated but to put such incriminating things on Facebook without proof is so dangerous. Why can't they just contact the police for advice rather than taking it upon themselves to be vigilantes and shaming people who may not have done anything wrong.

    Really does wind me up and many times I've felt like saying this to those posting these things. But then they'd probably turn on me. People need to engage brain before sharing.

    ReplyDelete

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