Thursday, 3 September 2015

Style Has No Size?



I received an email this morning, from a PR company associated with UK Plus Size Fashion Week that made me sigh. 

I've already ranted all across social media, but I wanted to just be able to go into a little more detail than sometimes 140 characters can give you. 

This is the picture that I was asked to share. From Evans, using the hashtag, #StyleHasNoSize 

My INSTANT reaction is, aren't they thin? For a retailer that goes up to a size 32 in some styles, they seem to have picked five models that wouldn't be out of place in a Robert Palmer video. They are like photocopies of each other, five tall and dare I say it? CURVY women, these women are not fat, they do not show the range of women that shop at Evans and this picture does not say to me that style has no size? 

Style obviously has a SHAPE though, as these women who are all TALL as well, are shaped in the same way. If style has no size, why not show the same outfit on a short girl? A fat girl, a short fat girl. 

Show some diversity, add some colour as well? Like the customers who shop at Evans. 

This image does not make me want to buy my clothes from Evans, or attend plus size fashion week. 

I would love your thoughts on this, in a place where you don't have to be restricted to 140 characters or less. 

Let me know your thoughts. 


Big Fashionista x x x 
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17 comments

  1. My thoughts are that this would be pretty "oooh controversial" were a designer such a topshop or pick any other highstreet brand to use models like these women. Don't get me wrong, they're beautiful!! Beautiful curvy women.

    But Evans is a PLUS SIZE label, and they need to choose models that represent their customer base - though it seems they are just a guilty of picking and choosing thinner models to best show off clothing rather than appeal to women of all shapes and sized (especially the larger sizes!).

    It's a shame really, because these women are beautiful, curvy ladies. But brands need to realise that women aren't all the same in a cookie cutter fashion - that they will have short, average and tall, slim, curvy and plus sized and every combination in between (not to mention skin colours too!)- and therefore must represent them all.

    Evans is not doing this well.

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    1. I would more than welcome a woman of this size in a line up of women who are all sizes, wouldn't you? I totally agree. Lack of representation here is terrible

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  2. Exactly what I thought when I saw it!! Why do none of them have fat bellies?? Am I the only women who has a noticeable belly??!

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    1. No Kaytee, you are not. I'm starting to think that the stores who stock plus size are no different from the media that want to keep us feeling bad about ourselves so that we buy ourself things to cheer ourselves up

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  3. I've found this quite interesting to watch unfold on Twitter, as I'm kind sitting on the fence with this one.

    Firstly let me make it clear; I completely agree that the models (are they models?) picked could have been more diverse in size, complexion and height. That goes without saying and is something so many brands, regardless of campaign whether it be beauty, fashion or plus size fashion, really seem to lack in their campaigns and something I find so frustrating to see. Brands need to be more aware of the image they are giving of their brands when they go for the typical look in models, and often it's not a positive one, at times extremely alienating.

    That said, I don't personally have an issue with the models used. Over the past few months I have seen more and more people in the plus size community berating people for, simply put, not being fat enough. I've had personal comments made my own figure/shape/size, told that my opinion is not valid because I am not of a size that fits into everyone's vision of plus size, and I have seen other people receive the same nasty treatment on Twitter.

    Evans caters for sizes 14-32, and as I already said, they definitely should have included a wider range of sizes in this campaign. BUT. I've seen so many people getting angry about this on Twitter, saying there is no way these girls are even a size 14. Erm, says who? OK so many of them are smaller on top than on bottom, but I reckon every single girl in this photo is at least a size 14 jeans, a couple are probably a size 16. Does that excuse Evans for not including larger sizes? Hell no. But these girls shouldn't be attacked like they are being on Twitter, and told, albeit indirectly, that they are 'not big enough' to represent Evans.

    Brands 100% need to re-evaluate the way they approach their advertising campaigns. But members of the plus size community also need to stop shaming people for not being 'big enough'. It's double-standards in my opinion....

    (FYI, this isn't based on you or things you've tweeted, this is my general opinion on the topic and your blog post was a good place to share my thoughts in more than 140 characters).

    xo

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    1. One of the reasons I wrote this is because people can't explain their opinions in 140 characters so I'm glad you've shared yours here.

      They are beautiful models. It's not their fault, I completely agree. It's not the stylists fault either: I'm just shocked that when they saw them all lined up, no-one thought, "bloody hell. Style has no size? Then why did we pick 5 women with the same body shape. Evans definitely needed some diversity here. Not to appease people, but because their message falls flat when it seems that style DOES have a preferred size.

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  4. I know that they needed to have just five women to fit the hashtag cross on their tops, but a woman in every size from 14-32 (as that is what the shop stocks) would have been so much better, IMO. To me, they all look *roughly* the same size.

    As a plus size girl my whole life, I don't take offence to this, but I wish that plus size retailers would get with the sodding programme and have a wider range of models for their clothing.

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    1. If they'd have had a woman over size 20 I'd have been a little happier. A size 32 would have made me ecstatic

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    2. Oh to see a size 28/30/32 modelling their clothes... but I'm guessing that'll be the day :/

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  5. I'm very petite and have such a hard time finding clothes that fit me! it's impossible to shop unless you're in a certain size range that some women just aren't in whether it's being bigger or smaller!

    http://hashtagliz.com

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  6. this makes me want to face palm, im a size 32 and honestly haven't used evans for a while now! your right it doesn't look right at all, everybody looks the exact same! they should of had at least a size 14, a size 32, and somewere around the middle like 22. not happy at all.

    C x

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  7. I think it was daft not to pick a diverse bunch of models in different shapes and heights and ethnicity. The cookie cutter approach weakens the message. I'm not angry, it's better than nothing but it is kind of the "acceptable" face of plus size and not the real one.

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  8. There is such a need for diversity, not just in size, height and colour - but age too! As a 40+ customer, I would dearly love to see people my age. It seems once you hit 30/35 that's it :-( Maybe one day....

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    1. You know what. Cathy. You are absolutely right. I am actually sorry that I missed that one. So very very true.

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  9. Apparently the lack of diversity was intentional, it was so the models looked "symmetrical". You couldn't make it up really.

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  10. I agree with Ashley. Whenever plus size fashion is placed in mainstream media, it's never a true reflection of what 'plus size' really is. Why should larger woman have to make do with images that don't truly represent them? It's frustrating and rather cowardly of Evans, as if they're scared to be true to themselves.

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  11. What amazed me more than anything was that style has no size.....as long as style is tall & wearing high heels. I would have loved to see short & tall, big & small, old & young, visibly disabled & not in this line up, as well as women of the shapes that every evans store has up on the walls (what is it, hourglass, circle & triangle?) It seemed weird to me.

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