Wednesday, 22 February 2017

When Companies Don't Retweet.


I'm kind of throwing this one out there to you guys today. Recently, I've noticed that doing a lot more fashion posts has put me in touch with a lot more brands than in the past. I love working with brands, who wouldn't? As bloggers, depending on the style of blog you write, sometimes the aim is to work with companies that you love and admire, for some it isn't and we just want to write down our words and say what we want to say. Every blogger is different, it is what makes us so varied and means that there is room in this blogosphere for  EVERY . SINGLE . ONE . OF . US. 


But lately, I've noticed a real change in the air, from bloggers having their images lifted from their blogs to be used in sponsored campaigns, without even crediting the original blogger, to bloggers being told that their content isn't good enough and they aren't going to be paid for their hard work.

One thing I have noticed personally is the lack of RT's from companies. There is NOTHING better than seeing a brand retweet your blog post, is there? And it feels so damn good when they do, but the radio silence when you share your post and the brand doesn't even acknowledge it on social media?

MAN THAT HURTS. THAT HURTS SO BADLY. 




We all want our work to be read by as many people as possible, of course we do, and when we have written a BANGING post with KILLER imagery that we have worked extremely hard on, we want the brand involved to push that retweet button, not only to spread our post far and wide, but also, it gives us a sense of pride and a feeling of achievement that "OUR" brand loves our work enough to give us a RT.

There are plenty of brands out there that do this, One I ALWAYS see RT'ing their bloggers is Navabi. They LOVE their bloggers and always share content that features their clothing, in fact they RT good blog posts that celebrate people, full stop.


But for every great company like Navabi, or Ideal World, who I recently worked with, there are TEN that won't RT,


WHY IS THAT?

Does anyone know?




Perhaps the blogger isn't "On Brand" enough? Or the PR company behind the brand doesn't want to flood their social media with blog posts? I don't know the actual answer, so I am throwing it out to you guys.


How do you feel when a brand you work with doesn't share your posts socially? Does it even matter to you? Or do you feel disappointed when you don't get a RT?


And how do you feel when they DO share your posts? Does it make you feel special? Or are you not bothered?


Let me know.













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9 comments

  1. I don't really give a stuff about not being RTd by brands, but what does fuck me off - HUGELY - is when brands only (and constantly) RT the same bloggers over and over, particularly when a) the blogger has been paid for the content and b) when the content is essentially a recycled press release.

    Aside from that, I'm not that bothered. I wrote content for the readers, not the brands, but I'm a bit odd that way. It's nice when it happens, don't get me wrong, but I don't expect it as a rule.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh god yes, I agree completely.
      Good point about writing for the readers, it's easy to forget that sometimes.

      Delete
  2. With some of the bigger brands you need to remember that their Twitter account is probably not manned by PR staff. It's usually customer service staff, so not as likely to be RTing as they are looking for questions to answer instead.

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    Replies
    1. That is a really good point. Easy to forget that.
      Xxxx

      Delete
  3. I'm with you on this - it's all down to social media management and the fact that they outsource it to people who either have taken on too much so have to schedule their output OR who actually don't know what they are doing OR who haven't been given the correct brief for managing the account.

    Whatever the reason, it's rude and isn't SOCIAL (keyword there).

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi! I've worked for several really large brands.

    It's pretty much impractical for me to retweet or link to anyone who doesn't have a prior agreement with us, because what sometimes happens is that then we risk the person asking for compensation, complaining about our use of their IP, or assuming that us retweeting them creates a relationship that it doesn't. All these things have really happened before and they're why we don't retweet.

    If I'm interested in using something a fan has said, I'll DM them and ask permission to use it or quote from it, and then I email them a release, and then it goes into my schedule.

    Scheduling isn't something that I do because I've taken on too much, either. Everything I post has to go through an approval process that includes the legal team and other marketing people - and the team who replies to comments for me has to be alerted that the post is coming and given talking points to reply (it's common for our posts to get hundreds of thousands of comments so one person could never do it all). Scheduling allows me to track this whole process.

    At a slightly smaller scale you can be much more slipshod, but where I am is much different.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for taking the time to comment, it is superb to get an insight into the process and really does help with the understanding as a blogger.

      Delete
  5. This is the first time I've read your blog, but something you've tweeted peaked my interest. As a former blogger (in a different sector), it became really apparent that your Twitter follower count was more important that your integrity. By this I mean it was ok to 20k fake followers as the appearence that you have 22k followers was more important.

    Then came the freebies; Journos & bloggers alike would tout for the free meals & pander to the ego of the chef/restaurant. PR's, Chef's & the restaurants would often RT such glowing reviews, which would often omit the detail that it was a freebie. Then came the next step, bloggers offering posts in exchange for freebies.

    To my mind, & the reason I blogged in the first place, was the joy of writing and getting my thoughts out there. Yes, no doubting that samples and public praise (RT's et al) are great. But bloggers shouldn't lose sight of why they blog, & if it isn't for the joy of writing or a potential career path, then question yourself some more.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I absolutely love this post! I think in some cases it's like a tick box that theses brands need to do on a long list of activities but they don't understand the power of a blogger or what they can achieve by working together - I mean Nouveau Lashes have it nailed and I'll be the first to champion their products because of the amazing relationships they have with their bloggers, the people who bring them business at a lower cost than traditional marketing. X

    ReplyDelete

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